Taxes

Give to Caesar what is Caesar's. That was an important statement at the time because the Emperor claimed to be God, and the Jews believed that they were disrespecting God, by paying taxes to the Emperor. When Jesus was asked the question about taxes, he asked whose face was on the coin. It was Caesar's face; the coin belonged to Caesar. The government makes money, and so by analogy, the money belongs to the people, and the people get to decide how money works for them. The people get to decide how much of that money goes to taxes and how much of that money remains in the private sector. Money is a tool, and it is a tool that should be used for the general welfare of everyone, not just 1% of the population. Capitalism is survival of the fittest and thus lives by the same rules as the animals in the jungle. What humanizes it, are the rules and regulations that society imposes on the game. We have higher taxes on the rich, and we have high taxes on estates because we want to keep that money in circulation for the rest of us; we do not want it to end up in just one spot. If too few people controlled all the money, they can manipulate the systems, and make sure that their wealth always ends up right back with them. Things like our bankruptcy laws humanize capitalism. It allows people to take a chance, and if they fail, we don't destroy their lives. Helping people who fall through the cracks humanizes it. Nobody gets rich by themselves; rather they need the help of the people and of the government. The more you get, the more you need to give back. Back when this country was at its height, the rich paid as much as 90%+ in taxes and still managed to get rich. We built a great infrastructure, with good paying jobs and helped industry with research and development, and we made higher education available to everyone. It is easy to convince people that taxes are the government taking from you. It is much harder to convince people to pay more taxes, but I think the quality of your children’s future depends on it. Rebuilding our infrastructure provides a lot of good-paying jobs, and Republicans know that, but unless we start increasing revenue, somehow there is no money for infrastructure. Trickle-down economics does not help the average person; it has failed time and time again, and yet here we go again. They gave us all enough crumbs to get it passed, but make no mistake about who walked away with cake. Our crumbs will dry up over the next 10 years, but they get to keep their cake. A lot of them will take their share of the cake and give it to their investors, many of whom will ship it overseas, so they don’t have to pay taxes on it. We can do better.